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PEGI vs. ESRB



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32 replies to this topic

#1  Share
Tortimer

Tortimer

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I am using PEGI since PEGI is so widely used.


So, with games becoming more popular and being arbitrarily cited as a cause of violence more and more often, there has been greater emphasis on stricter scrutiny of ratings. Some of us may remember the days where most game were rated E and KA games still existed. However, I feel it might be interesting to take a look at two different rating systems: PEGI and ESRB.

I feel the ESRB needs no introduction, since I am pretty sure most of us use it over here. PEGI on the other hand probably needs more of an introduction. PEGI is the rating system used in Europe, with ratings 4+, 7+ (6+ Portugal), 12+, 17+, 18+. 17+, much like our M, requires parental consent to purchase, and 18+ requires an age of 18 or older to play. The eight content descriptors use pictures instead of words to describe the content (which can be read online. This is probably due to the fact PEGI is used in so many countries, many of which don't speak English, they need to default to something more universal). Perhaps most important about the PEGI system is that the people who rate the game, NICAM, rate all forms of media: Unlike America where individual institutions rate individual mediums (the US differs ultimately because MPAA has a copyright over their ratings).

Now, with all this in mind, I feel that PEGI is an overall effective system. Unfortunately, I wouldn't be surprised if, despite constant pressure for the ESRB to explain the system, many parents don't understand the ESRB system. I feel that PEGI's simple Age system makes it easier for unknowing parents to learn about ratings since, well, it's just ages. And, even though the pictures are probably used to avoid English (given that English speakers, and any language speaker, are probably a minority), it again simplifies things. I also feel that PEGI's rater, NICAM, rating all media also provides for more consistency among media. It startles me how many double standards there are for games. Overall, I feel PEGI is a more effective system because it doesn't require learning, which unfortunately some parents don't want to do, and has more constitency across media.

What about your guy's opinions?

Edited by ZORAPRIME, Feb 25 2010, 01:47 AM

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#2  Share
KEK Inc.  

KEK Inc.

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The ERSB is pretty straightforward though. I think the numbering is just a formality and really isn't a bid deal to be frank.

E = everyone
E10 = 10+
Teen = 13+
Mature = Parental Guidance 17+ (similar to R in films and MA in TV)
Adult Only = 18+

I do agree there is a language barrier for those who don't speak English, but I think the ERSB is only used in Canada and the United States.

To be honest, the rating system is inconsistent. Dante's Inferno probably should have been an AO, while games like Brawl should have been an E10.

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#3  Share
Vortex

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Did I read that right? They use PEGI in Japan? I thought it was only in use in Europe, and Japan used CERO instead.

#4  Share
AdamNW

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Yeah, I wasn't aware Japan used PEGI either.

I prefer the ESRB because it really lets the parents decide if their child should be playing the game. A number seems far more constricting.

#5  Share
Wreck It Ralph  

Wreck It Ralph

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I noticed you said PEGI is used in Japan. It is not, it's used in Europe. CERO is what Japan uses. Though it's clearly a typo since you mentioned Portugal. :P

Off-topic. Oh son of a *****, Kek. Your sig is saying my town is due for freezing rain. I hate freezing rain.

Edited by Hero_Of_Fate, Feb 25 2010, 01:37 AM

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#6  Share
Scrippy

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I'm sorry, but if you understand English and you don't understand ESRB ratings, you're an idiot.
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#7  Share
Tortimer

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I'm sorry, but if you understand English and you don't understand ESRB ratings, you're an idiot.


Tell that to the looping videos in wal-mart explaining the ESRB system from the ground up matty;

I'm perfectly fine with it, cause I sue it all the time.


@Others: Yay, that was a typo on my part. PEGI is Europe, CERO is Japan. I knew PEGI was Europe, just was being a bit absentminded writing this.

Yeah, I wasn't aware Japan used PEGI either.

I prefer the ESRB because it really lets the parents decide if their child should be playing the game. A number seems far more constricting.


Uhh... we have numbers too. We just use verbal descriptors for our numbers.

You don't need to be 12 or older to purchase a 12+ game. It's just a recommendation. Much like for Teen, you don't need to be 13 or older. It's just a recommendation.

Edited by ZORAPRIME, Feb 25 2010, 01:49 AM

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#8  Share
Scrippy

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I'm sorry, but if you understand English and you don't understand ESRB ratings, you're an idiot.


Tell that to the looping videos in wal-mart explaining the ESRB system from the ground up matty;

All you have to do is read the box. :|
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#9  Share
Scythe Death

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I noticed you said PEGI is used in Japan. It is not, it's used in Europe. CERO is what Japan uses.

^Notice how PEGI is no longer as appealing to people.

If it's formal debate vocabulary you want to use, then I guess I should address your ad homonym.

Spoiler

#10  Share
Wreck It Ralph  

Wreck It Ralph

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You'd think PEGI is more effective until you see the descriptors. They're just pictures. For instance: Discrimination is represented by a black stick figure in between 2 white stick figures. Who the hell is going to understand that?
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#11  Share
Scythe Death

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You'd think PEGI is more effective until you see the descriptors. They're just pictures. For instance: Discrimination is represented by a black stick figure in between 2 white stick figures. Who the hell is going to understand that?

Racist people.

If it's formal debate vocabulary you want to use, then I guess I should address your ad homonym.

Spoiler

#12  Share
AdamNW

AdamNW

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I'm sorry, but if you understand English and you don't understand ESRB ratings, you're an idiot.


Tell that to the looping videos in wal-mart explaining the ESRB system from the ground up matty;

I'm perfectly fine with it, cause I sue it all the time.


@Others: Yay, that was a typo on my part. PEGI is Europe, CERO is Japan. I knew PEGI was Europe, just was being a bit absentminded writing this.

Yeah, I wasn't aware Japan used PEGI either.

I prefer the ESRB because it really lets the parents decide if their child should be playing the game. A number seems far more constricting.


Uhh... we have numbers too. We just use verbal descriptors for our numbers.

It gives a better consensus as to who should play the game than just having the number itself. I was referring to the parents who buy the games, not the kids.

#13  Share
Wreck It Ralph  

Wreck It Ralph

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So it's a draw to make racist people buy the game?
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#14  Share
Scythe Death

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So it's a draw to make racist people buy the game?

No, PEGI is just very inappropriate.

If it's formal debate vocabulary you want to use, then I guess I should address your ad homonym.

Spoiler

#15  Share
Wreck It Ralph  

Wreck It Ralph

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It's also my understanding that PEGI has real legal weight in the countries that accept it. If that's the case, then that's the only reason it's successful.
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#16  Share
Guest- Wonder Pink

Guest- Wonder Pink
PEGI works mainly for the following reasons:
Governed by government and soon to be legalized by the EU.
Legalized by many governments including the UK
It is not controlled by industry.
It is not funded by industry.
Industry is forced to submit all info about the game, and is severely punished for withholding or lying about info.
They actually play the game.
They also have the power over marketing of the game including demos and trailers.
* Germany does not use PEGI, instead of USK which is legal binding, Germany is the biggest EU country.

Reasons why ESRB fails:
Industry controls ESRB board of directors.
ESRB bases its ratings based on footage about the game and questionnaire filled out by developers, games are not played.
Ratings also based on information that companies submit, many leave out information or are dishonest to get lower ratings.
ESRB charges for ratings based on development costs.
ESRB cannot punish anyone for breakage of rules.

Many developers and publishers over the years have expressed dismay over the rating system being too strict, and there is a push to loosen up the rating system or even to dissolve the system.

Edited by M!, Feb 25 2010, 02:28 AM


#17  Share
EmmBee

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I know ESRB miss-rates a lot of games that could be E or even T. Strong Bads Cool Game for Attractive People episode 1 got a T rating due to Homestar being seen with Pixleated Nudity :|

like M! said, it seems the PEGI actually plays the games instead of slap a rating on the box due to footage they've seen...

#18  Share
Hiei

Hiei
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Reasons why ESRB fails:
Industry controls ESRB board of directors.
ESRB bases its ratings based on footage about the game and questionnaire filled out by developers, games are not played.
Ratings also based on information that companies submit, many leave out information or are dishonest to get lower ratings.
ESRB charges for ratings based on development costs.
ESRB cannot punish anyone for breakage of rules.

Many developers and publishers over the years have expressed dismay over the rating system being too strict, and there is a push to loosen up the rating system or even to dissolve the system.


Do you not remember the Hot Coffee scandal? Even though it was the biggest farce I've ever seen, they were able to fine Rockstar. The fees are flat as well, development costs has nothing to do with it, and they do play the game if it's warranted. Honestly, a trailer is sufficient for an overwhelming majority of games, and playing games all the way through is impractical.

PEGI is also run by the European version of the ESA, I have no idea where the hell you're getting the omg independence idea.

http://en.wikipedia....ation_of_Europe

PEGI is also legally binding. You're giving a non-governmental organization with no accountability the force of law. Do you realize how dangerous that is?

Edited by Hiei, Feb 25 2010, 09:28 AM

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#19  Share
Guest- Wonder Pink

Guest- Wonder Pink

Reasons why ESRB fails:
Industry controls ESRB board of directors.
ESRB bases its ratings based on footage about the game and questionnaire filled out by developers, games are not played.
Ratings also based on information that companies submit, many leave out information or are dishonest to get lower ratings.
ESRB charges for ratings based on development costs.
ESRB cannot punish anyone for breakage of rules.

Many developers and publishers over the years have expressed dismay over the rating system being too strict, and there is a push to loosen up the rating system or even to dissolve the system.


Do you not remember the Hot Coffee scandal? Even though it was the biggest farce I've ever seen, they were able to fine Rockstar. The fees are flat as well, development costs has nothing to do with it, and they do play the game if it's warranted. Honestly, a trailer is sufficient for an overwhelming majority of games, and playing games all the way through is impractical.

PEGI is also run by the European version of the ESA, I have no idea where the hell you're getting the omg independence idea.

http://en.wikipedia....ation_of_Europe

PEGI is also legally binding. You're giving a non-governmental organization with no accountability the force of law. Do you realize how dangerous that is?

Actually The only reason why the Rockstar and ESRB agreed on the amount was due to a month of public anger and a legal threats.
It didn't help that the ESRB President was well ill informed when she addressed the media.
PEGI system is governed by numerous Committees, which are comprised by parent/consumer body representatives, child psychologists, media specialists, civil servants, academics and legal advisers versed in the protection of minors in Europe.
The main advisory board is also governed the same way.
This is how they get their independence, instead of being ran by the industry.
They also work with the EU.
The legality of the rating system only pertains to the buying a game at retail and it only legal in some of the countries including the UK for now.
If anything making the rating system enforceable when buying a game at retail will shield the industry from lawsuits.

#20  Share
Hiei

Hiei
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Jesus Christ, get your facts straight. The ESRB outright fined Rockstar. However, it was nonsense to begin with because code gets left over all the time. This is how programming works. It was nothing of Rockstar's fault. PEGI still has ties to the gaming industry. Them working with the EU doesn't mean anything. The EU is a giant farce of a bureaucracy that doesn't do anything of any importance.

The industry is immune to lawsuits in the US. To make it a crime to sell an M rated game to a minor would violate the 1st, 14th, and in many cases 8th Amendments. You also cannot delegate governmental authority to a non-government entity because they HAVE NO ACCOUNTABILITY. Could you imagine the ****storm that would happen in the US if companies like Blackwater were allowed to be contracted out for police?

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